Skip to main content

Low carb high fat

Blackened Pork Tenderloin, Yard Long Beans and Riced Cauliflower

Blackened Pork Tenderloin, Yard Long Beans and Riced Cauliflower

I was called for jury duty earlier this week, and had time to kill at lunch, so I wandered into Chinatown. All the product markets reminded me that I hadn’t had yard long green beans in ages, so I picked up a bunch. They are so much better than regular green beans; more on par with haricot verts, but different. If you have never tried them, give the yard -longs a shot!

I cook the blackened tenderloin in the oven, which saves my stove from becoming a mess and couldn’t be easier!

Blackened Pork Tenderloin

Yard Long Beans

Serves 4

Chinese yard-long beans

1 pound yard long beans, cut into bite-sized pieces

Butter

Slivered raw almonds

Salt and pepper

Cook beans in a bit of water until they are bright green, 2-3 minutes. Drain water. On a medium flame, melt butter and add beans and almonds. Stir until almonds are lightly brown and beans are cooked, about 5 minutes.

Crispy Tofu with Baby Bok Choy and Shirataki Noodles in Peanut Sauce

Low carb crispy Tofu with Baby Bok Choy and Shirataki Noodles in Peanut Sauce

This peanut sauce recipe has been adapted over 30 years from the traditional Szechuan Cold Noodle recipe found in many Chinese restaurants. I made it constantly in my 20’s, when I was broke and would buy 3-pound bags of pasta. I switched to the traditional Asian noodles when I had more money later.

The peanut sauce is delicious, but unlike the Asian version, I add no sugar. This sauce can obviously be used on noodles, but it is fantastic to use in this dish or others that are low carb. I made this for dinner Friday, and had lots of sauce left and will make it again Monday with the addition of Shirataki noodles. If you don’t want crispy tofu, it is also good baked or even cubed and heated with the bok choy. If you aren’t into tofu, substitute chicken.

Trust me on this—the peanut sauce is so good you could add it to dirty socks and they’d taste delicious!

Crispy Tofu with Baby Bok Choy and Shirataki Noodles in Peanut Sauce

Serves 2

1 pound extra firm tofu, dried and crumbled

1 pound baby bok choy, cleaned with stems and leaves separated and both roughly chopped

1 bag Shirataki noodles, rinsed and drained

4 tablespoons peanut or avocado oil

 5 cloves garlic, minced

1-2 tablespoons ginger, minced

3 tablespoon black and/or white sesame seeds

1 bunch scallions, chopped

2 tablespoon San-J® All Purpose Szechuan Hot and Spicy Sauce

1 cup crunchy or smooth natural peanut butter

3 tablespoons soy or tamari sauce

1 teaspoon sesame oil

Hot pepper flakes to taste

Water

Turn broiler on and place rack 6” from heat. Line a baking tray with parchment paper. Mix  2 tablespoons of peanut oil into tofu. Add salt, pepper and some hot pepper flakes. Broil for 20-25 minutes, turning once, until light brown.

Make sauce: on medium low heat, add 1 tablespoon peanut oil and add garlic, ginger, sesame seeds, hot pepper and cook a couple minutes. Add peanut butter, tamari, San-J® All Purpose Szechuan Hot and Spicy Sauce and mix. Add water until desired consistency. Turn off heat and add sesame oil. Taste and adjust to taste.

Heat pan with 1 tablespoon peanut oil on high and add bok choy stems. Cook for about 5 minutes and add leaves. cook 2 minutes and add a bit of peanut sauce. Stir. Add Shirataki noodles and stir until hot.

Put noodles and bok choy into a bowl, add crispy tofu and top with sauce. Bring extra sauce to table.

Low Carb Chicken or Beef Enchiladas

Low carb beef enchiladas

I usually make chicken enchiladas, but made a big batch of bone broth stock and needed to use the meat that had cooked for hours and didn’t have much flavor left, yet was nice and tender. Enchiladas made sense, as there are all kinds of flavors going on. It was delicious and there was enough for three nights for my husband and me.

If you decide to make bone broth, I used about 4 pounds of soup bones, with meat. After cooking, it yielded 1 pound of meat that I easily shredded. Bone broth recipe

Chicken or Beef Enchiladas

Serves 6

Low carb tortillas, 2 per person

1 pint sour cream

½ pound shredded cheddar + jack , reserve some for top

1 pound cooked chicken or beef, shredded or small pieces

2 jalapenos, seeds removed and minced

 ½ pound mushrooms, chopped

1 small red cabbage quartered, and sautéed extra for topping or chopped kale

6 cloves garlic chopped

1 large onion, chopped

Sauce topping

Salsa or roasted grape tomatoes, roughly chopped

Green olives, sliced

Avocado, chopped

Scallion, chopped

Lemon juice

Salt and pepper

Baby spinach for plate

Preheat oven to 350. Sauté onion on low until softened, add mushrooms, jalapenos and garlic and raise heat, cooking until mushroom lose water and brown a bit.  Add kale or cabbage and cook 5 minutes. Add chicken or beef and allow mixture to get hot. Allow to cool and few minutes and add remaining filling ingredients. Fill two tortillas per person.  Add extra cheese on top. Cover for 20 minutes in oven and remove cover for last 10 minutes. Bake a total of 30 minutes or until is bubbling.

Mix tomatoes, avocado, scallions, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

Arrange spinach on plate and add enchiladas. Top with avocado/tomato mixture.

The Low Carb High Fiber Diet

I really like and respect The Week, but they were simply wrong in an article published 2/1/2019 called “Fiber’s Many Benefits”.

They wrote: “In a blow to proponents of low-carbohydrate diets, a landmark study has found that people who eat more fiber–found in fruit, begetables, and whole-grain cereals, pasta and bread–are less likely to die early or suffer from a chronic condition such as cardiovascular disease or cancer.”

See, you can eat a high fiber, low carb diet.

Last time I checked, low carb diets include vegetables. Many low carb vegetables and some fruit contain a lot of fiber, especially avocadoes at about 20 grams per fruit. Other low carb vegetables with high contents of fiber are broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, artichokes, and spinach.

Nuts have fiber.

There is even a low carb, high fiber bean: black soy beans have 1 gram of carb and 7 grams of fiber in ½ cup!

Eden organic balck soybeans

And then there are the superfoods that are carbs, but their high fiber content basically negates the carb. These foods can and should be consumed on the low carb diet. They are:

•             Chia 8 grams of fiber, 8 grams of carbs in 2 tablespoons

•             Psyllium husk 4 grams fiber, 4 grams carbs in 1 teaspoon

•             Flax seed 3 grams fiber, 4 grams carbs in 2 tablespoons

•             Hemp Hearts 2 grams fiber, 2 gram carb in 3 tablespoons

The Week article also says that “American adults consume an average of 15 grams” of fiber per day and we should be eating 25-30 grams. The average American eats a high carb diet, but doesn’t get the fiber. Clearly, this article misses the point. Most high carb foods American eat are low in fiber, because they eat junky carbs.

The point is you can eat 30 grams of fiber and still be on a low carb diet.

Keto Roll #3

Keto Rolls #3
Keto Rolls #3

A note on the photo…I am not a baker—I am a cook—and these aren’t “perfect”. I rarely baked anything before going Keto, because I don’t like to. However, I like to eat these suckers more than I don’t like baking, especially since buying Keto friendly bread is not an option, as the only breads available are awful and/or filled with processed ingredients. Baked all three types of rolls I make to get it out of the way for a few weeks. Also, one thing I like is that all of these recipes require only one bowl to make, so cleanup is easy.

This is not my recipe, and I am sorry, but do not have the baker’s name who created it. Please let me know if you recognize it and I can give credit to this awesome low carb roll!

Keto Roll #3

Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking pan with parchment paper.

Ingredients

2 T sunflower seeds

2 T pepitas

1 T sesame seed

3 cups almond flour

2 T psyllium powder

2 T flax meal

1 t baking soda

1 t salt

4 large eggs

4 T avocado oil

2 T apple cider vinegar

½ cup boiling water

Mix seeds and set aside. Mix flour, psyllium, flaxseed, baking soda, salt and half seeds. Add eggs, oil, vinegar and stir. Add water. Form 10-12 rolls, or less, if you want them large. Sprinkle remaining seeds on top of rolls. Bake 30 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean and you have a light brown top crust.

Pork Chops with Dijon Sauce

Pork chops with dijon sauce, mashed cauliflower and roasted veggies

This recipe was created by Julia Reed, and you can find it here: The New York Times

This dish features a classic French sauce that is delicious. I didn’t have wine, so used more homemade chicken bone broth. I made mashed cauliflower for all that lovely sauce.

The pork chops come from Hemlock Hill Farm and are pasture raised. They were huge chops and leftovers were perfect for salad.

But that sauce…on Sunday, I bought a baguette from Kaiser Maison and indulged, dipping the hot bread in the sauce. It was worth every carb…

Beef Stew

Pasture raised beef stew

When I eat meat, it’s pasture raised and grass fed. Thereare many reasons, including it is more humane, healthier and tastier. See here for a guide.

This is a classic dish that never gets old. The low carbversion has it sitting atop spiralized zucchini. I’ll admit that I had this with a delicious rosemary baguette; it was the weekend and occasionally, I’llhave some carbs.

For the richest flavor, make your own stock. Here is how. If you do purchase stock, make it organic. The Dijon mustard adds a bit moredepth, but you won’t taste it per se.

Beef Stew

2 pounds pasture raised beef stew meat, excess fat removed

2 medium onions, chopped

½ pound shitake mushroom, chopped

5 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 large carrot, chopped into small pieces

2 stalks celery, chopped

1 head kale, spines removed and chopped

Cauliflower, optional

Peas, optional

Salt and pepper

3 cups organic, pasture raised beef or chicken bone broth

2 tablespoons tallow, butter or ghee

Crème fraiche or sour cream

Spiralized zucchini

Heat 1 tablespoon fat on high in a dutch oven. When hot, add meat; add salt and pepper, but don’t crowd and do in batches if necessary. Brown on all sides and remove. Turn heat to low and add more oil if needed and sauté onions, allowing them to get soft. Raise heat and add mushroom, cooking until liquid is released, 5-10 minutes. Add garlic and stir for a minute. Add meat, mustard and stock, bringing to a boil. Lower to low and cover; cook for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Add carrots, and cauliflower; cook another 20 minutes. Add kale and cook final 10 minutes. Add peas. Put zucchini in a eating bowl, add stew and a dollop of crème fraiche or sour cream.

Low Carb “Wonton” Soup

Low Carb “Wonton Soup”

Before I started eating low car, I made this soup with real wonton wrappers and painstakingly filled each one with a pork mixture. I only use pork because my husband is allergic to shrimp; use both shrimp and pork for a more authentic taste. At some point, I got too lazy to make the wontons and just tossed them into the soup. Which is why removing them and using shirataki noodles seemed like the natural move when going low carb, as the “noodles” give that slippery wonton mouth feel but with no added carbs! I also add lots of veggies and keep the fat from the homemade bone broth and meat to make this a nutritious and delicious one pot meal.

You could make this vegetarian with crumbled tofu. Extra points for making it crispy under broiler!

Low Carb “Wonton” soup

Serves 4

1 pound ground pork or ½ pound ground pork and ½ pound shrimp, chopped or crispy tofu, see recipe below

4 cloves garlic, minced

1” ginger minced

½ bunch scallion, chopped

2 tablespoons organic tamari

1 tablespoon sesame oil

2 packages shirataki noodles, drained

5 cups organic turkey, chicken bone stock or vegetable stock

1 large carrot, cut in small pieces

2 stalks celery, cut into small pieces

Organic animal fat, ghee, butter or avocado oil to cover bottom of pot

1 small head savoy cabbage, shredded

7 ounces baby spinach

Brown pork medium high. When browned, lower heat and add ginger and garlic stirring until fragrant, 1 minute. Add scallion and stir. Add stock. When boiling add carrots and cook about 10 minutes. Add all remaining ingredients except sesame oil, noodles and baby spinach. Cook for 10 minutes. Turn off heat and add sesame oil, spinach, shirataki  noodles, salt and pepper to taste.

Pork Tenderloin with Chimichurri Sauce, Black Soy Beans, Butternut Squash & Broccoli

Chimichurri Pork tenderloin with black soy beans, mashed butternut squash and sautéed broccoli

I hadn’t made this dish in forever because I like it with black beans and until recently, didn’t know about the magical low carb black soy beans, with net 1 carbs! The chimichurri sauce makes this dish come alive, and I sprinkle it on the meat, beans and steamed broccoli.

Pork Tenderloin with Chimichurri Sauce

Serves 4

1 pound pork tenderloin

3 t chopped garlic, divided

1 t salt

½ t cumin

1 T + 1t oregano

¼ cup finely chopped onion

½ cup + 3 T olive oil

½ cup parsley, loosely chopped

¼ cup lime juice

2 T wine vinegar

Place tenderloins on heavy-duty aluminum foil. Coat with 2t garlic, salt, cumin, 1 t oregano and onion. Sprinkle with 3 T oil lemon and marinate 8-24 hours. Wrap in double foil and bake in oven 350 1 hour.

Make sauce: combine parsley, lime, red vinegar, oil, garlic, salt and pepper, oregano.

Serve with black beans.

Indian Spiced Spinach with Paneer on Zucchini

Indian Spiced Spinach with Paneer over Zucchini

I buy mostly fresh vegetables and fruits, but certain frozen ones can’t be beat—like Trader Joe’s frozen spinach. A full one pound, the spinach is loose, not in a block, so you can use whatever amount you want. I often take about a third for my frittatas, for example. Both their organic and pesticide free (not sure what the difference is, other than a certification) are around $2.00—a real bargain compared to the 7 ounces of  organic baby spinach that goes for $5.00.

Trader Joe’s Spinach

As you can see, I just open the bag and let it defrost in a colander for a couple hours. If it is still frozen when I need it, I run some hot water on it and remove excess water. It doesn’t need to cook; just put it into what recipe you need it for.

For example, my spinach artichoke dip is super easy because I defrost the spinach, mix it with the rest of the ingredients and bake. Boom—done!

I make this recipe with either paneer or tofu. The last time I made it, I put it on a bed of spaghetti squash. Both are good.

Indian Spiced Spinach with Paneer on Zucchini

2 pounds frozen spinach, drained and squeezed dry

2 cans coconut cream or milk

2 medium onions, chopped

6 cloves garlic, minced

1 “ piece ginger, minced

2 tablespoons coriander

2 tablespoons cumin

1 tablespoon turmeric

1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes or 1 tablespoon Korean red pepper

2 tablespoons mild curry

Salt

Pepper

Coconut or avocado oil or ghee

Water or chicken stock as needed

2 pounds tofu, dried and crumbled

Or

1-2 8 ounce blocks of paneer, cut into small pieces and dusted with spices

1 spaghetti squash, roasted or 2 zucchini, spiralized

Saute onion until wilted on medium heat. Add ginger and garlic and stir until fragrant, about a minutes. Add spices and turn to low and stir for a couple minutes. Add coconut milk or cream. Heat and add spinach and cook until hot. Add some water or chicken stock as needed.

Tofu

Salt and pepper

1 tablespoon Korean red pepper flakes or ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

2 tablespoons avocado oil

Put on broiler and rack 6 inches away from broiler. Spread tofu on a tray on parchment. Add oil and spices. Broil 20-25 minutes or until brown, turning mid-way through.

Paneer

Ghee or avocado oil

Sauté on medium high until brown

Put squash on a plate, add spinach and top with paneer or tofu. If using zucchini, keep it raw and put a mound on each plates and top with spinach mixture and tofu or paneer.

 

MENU